Gianna Michaels in Dyme Def’s “Do Something” video (NSFW-lite)
Gianna Michaels at Adult Entertainment Expo 2008

Image via Wikipedia

This video is posted purely for the sake of noting a popular p0rn star is prominently featured in it. Nothing about this video is pornographic. Nothing about this video is life-changing or inspiring, so it doesn’t fall under the concept of an Audio/Visual Gem. The song is solid and AVN Award winner Gianna Michaels is in it.

Dyme Def is a rap crew out of Washington state and they have a new project called Sex Tape, sponsored by the T.I.T.S Brand (you’re getting how all this ties in, right?). If the sound of this song resonates with you, then you should support the video production budget (Gianna was probably paid $$$$) and buy Sex Tape. Here are the links (Label store / iTunes).

Dyme Def - Sex Tape on AmazonLike the song? Consider buying the project! Each purchase helps this blog continue to provide compelling content such as this.

Once you are done watching and/or listening, how effective do you think this marriage of media producers will be? Everything seems to be in place. How do you their respective audiences will respond?

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This entry was posted on Tuesday, June 29th, 2010 at 4:46 PM and is filed under People, Tunes, Videos. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.
  • PreciseHero

    I think I've enjoyed her other works more.

  • http://fryinginvein.com HubertGAM

    Hey PH, thanks for your comment. And… no comment. ;)

  • hadi kadri

    hubert, you asked the question elsewhere, “how much does sex really sell?” outside of the porn industry, i don't believe it sells much at all – i think it's an exceedingly tired cliché that folks who don't know understand marketing at all love to quote. as in this example, sex may draw attention, but there's a big difference and a long way to go between attention and conversion (making the sale). if the talent is not there, i'm certainly not going to buy the music just because the video's full of objectified women. there are too many other (and better) artists out there who have something new and less obnoxious to say.

    speaking of objectified women and tired clichés, (and not that you asked, but) isn't it about time for hip-hop as a community to evolve past the acceptance of this disrespect as status quo and start calling out artists who use a whole gender as props in their videos and disposable objects in their songs? i'm all for grown-folks lyrics and the freedom to write songs about whatever moves you – but this particular mode is disproportionally prevalent and mainstream; and it's well past time to collectively move forward on this issue. i'm not just offended, i'm bored.

    good topic! :) thanks as always for starting the discussion.

    • http://fryinginvein.com Hubert Sawyers III

      Bravo Hadi, love your comments. Thank you.

      The example here borders on a gimmick. Not knowing the true nature of this group, it is hard to say whether commissioning a pr0n star for a video is really in-line with their brand. That is why I question this scenario, even if it is, it isn’t really doing it for me.

      Yes, rap music is abusive. The kids love it, so it keeps getting made. We have become so desensitized that we do nothing about it anymore. LOL, but sad.

  • http://twitter.com/WEKetchum WEKetchum

    With how oversexed a lot of rap is, it only makes sense that porn is incorporated somehow – it's not really done enough on the music end. If Gianna Michaels and T.I.T.S. push this as much as Dyme Def does, they should be in decent shape. Hopefully, they have some sort of purchase incentive – if you buy the CD, you get an exclusive DVD or link to Gianna Michaels porno, or free T.I.T.S. merch. That makes it somewhat more likely for people to buy the material even if they don't like the music. If they do like the music, however, it's golden.

    • http://fryinginvein.com Hubert Sawyers III

      Hey Will, thanks for your comment, man!

      I do find this grouping fitting, but I wonder if this was really thought out as deep as we are looking at it. Only time will tell, really, because I know I have no interest in T.I.T.S. or Gianna in any greater capacity after watching the video. I do want to keep my eye out for Dyme Def, but to see if they trip up and build a greater buzz off of this. Song > Video, so I think the balance is in Dyme Def’s favor. The borderline gimmick could do them some good. Maybe.

  • http://fryinginvein.com Hubert Sawyers III

    Bravo Hadi, love your comments. Thank you.

    The example here borders on a gimmick. Not knowing the true nature of this group, it is hard to say whether commissioning a pr0n star for a video is really in-line with their brand. That is why I question this scenario, even if it is, it isn’t really doing it for me.

    Yes, rap music is abusive. The kids love it, so it keeps getting made. We have become so desensitized that we do nothing about it anymore. LOL, but sad.

  • http://fryinginvein.com Hubert Sawyers III

    Hey Will, thanks for your comment, man!

    I do find this grouping fitting, but I wonder if this was really thought out as deep as we are looking at it. Only time will tell, really, because I know I have no interest in T.I.T.S. or Gianna in any greater capacity after watching the video. I do want to keep my eye out for Dyme Def, but to see if they trip up and build a greater buzz off of this. Song > Video, so I think the balance is in Dyme Def’s favor. The borderline gimmick could do them some good. Maybe.

  • http://janefader.com Jane Fader

    This video is RIPE my friend! The song is like a heavy, rocked out, hip hop, pornified version of Raphael Saadiq's “Let's Take a Walk.” Dyme Def is super cool. In fact, the whole thing is dangerously cool. Thanks for posting it. Seeing stuff like this gives me a second wind.

    There are so many things I have to say about “Do Something,” and the video deserves commentary in every aspect. I'm going to continue thinking and researching everything–the success of the TITS t-shirt company is something I'm particularly interested in (anyone from Seattle care to report?). Also, I'd like to sort out the facts about partnerships between adult businesses and “mainstream” media: I was surprised at Hadi and WE's comments about a new or the inevitable coming of porn/mainstream. I thought it was well established that porn businesses are integrated family members in media conglomerates, but when I went to find a few examples I couldn't easily find any. Time to straighten that out.

    So here is my brilliant observation: “Do Something” features three different types of female sex symbols that are particular to today's mediascape: the video vixen, the sex tape scandalmonger, and the porn actress. These three figures are often all lumped into the “porn” category, but I think we need to start distinguishing between the different kinds of sexuality that are represented–variety exists, even in the category of performance-based, commercial sex. There is also something racially significant going on–race plays a role in both porn and hip-hop, and so too in the characterization of the ladies in question.

    I'm developing characterizations for these characters (and possibly some better names), so keep your eyes peeled!

    • http://fryinginvein.com HubertGAM

      This reply is late, Jane, but thanks for your awesome comment! I hope you eventually post a follow-up to this on your blog!